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In an article titled “The Face Behind Bitcoin”, journalist Leah McGrath Goodman writes that an unemployed engineer in Temple City, California is in fact Bitcoin’s creator. Based on speculations and interviews with Dorian’s family, Goodman’s article ultimately draws an enourmous amount of worldwide attention to Dorian Nakamoto, who denies any involvement in Bitcoin and asks for privacy from the media.
No discussion of Bitcoin’s price would be complete without a mention of the role market manipulation plays in adding to price volatility. At that time, Bitcoin’s all-time high above $1000 was partly driven by an automated trading algorithms, or “bots,” running on the Mt. Gox exchange. All evidence suggests that these bots were operating fraudulently under the direction of exchange operator, Mark Karpeles, bidding up the price with phantom funds.
The entire Bitcoin network uses a block chain. This block chain is basically a shared public ledger that allows for bitcoin wallets to calculate their spendable balances and to verify any new transactions. The block chain uses cryptography to ensure the integrity and chronological order of transactions.
Investors who have their bitcoin on exchanges or wallets that support the new currency will soon see their holdings double, with one unit in bitcoin cash added for every bitcoin. But that doesn’t mean the value of investors’ holdings will double.
Wallet holders would have been hoping for a better start to the week but news of another mainstream finance firm being spooked by price volatility and regulatory threats means that other credit cards retailers around the world will be studying the fallout from Lloyds’ ban.
The Reserve Bank of India, the country’s central bank, has issued three separate Bitcoin warnings since 2013. Last month the European Central Bank vice president said Bitcoin was a “speculative asset” where investors were “taking that risk of buying at such high prices”.
Gavin Andresen Andreas Antonopoulos Adam Back Wences Casares Hal Finney Satoshi Nakamoto Charlie Shrem Nick Szabo Amir Taaki Ross Ulbricht Roger Ver Winklevoss twins Erik Voorhees Marc Andreessen Mark Karpelès Vitalik Buterin Tim Draper Patrick Byrne
On 23 June 2013, it was reported that the US Drug Enforcement Administration listed 11.02 bitcoins as a seized asset in a United States Department of Justice seizure notice pursuant to 21 U.S.C. § 881.[55] It is the first time a government agency has claimed to have seized bitcoin.[56][57]
When Mt. Gox opened an American bank account with Wells Fargo, President and CEO Mark Karpelès answered “no” to the questions, “Do you deal in or exchange currency for your customer?” and “Does your business accept funds from customers and send the funds based on customers’ instructions (Money Transmitter)?” The U.S. Government thinks otherwise. With the warrant signed, Homeland Security Investigations seizes $2,915,507.40 from an account owned by a Mt. Gox subsidiary that was used to process payments to and from U.S. customers, and the future of Bitcoin’s legal status becomes ever more uncertain.
Several early adopters were wise or fortunate enough to earn, buy or mine vast quantities of Bitcoin before it held significant value. The most famous of these is Bitcoin’s creator, Satoshi Nakomoto. Satoshi is thought to hold one million bitcoins or roughly 4.75% of the total supply (of 21 million). If Satoshi were to dump these coins on the market, the ensuing supply glut would collapse the price. The same holds true for any major holder. However, any rational individual seeking to maximise their returns would distribute their sales over time, so as to minimize price impact.
In order for a transaction to be it must be packed in a block that utilizes strict cryptographic rules to be verified by the network. The mining process also prevents individual control of the block chain as well as the modification of any blocks.
On 18 March 2013, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (or FinCEN), a bureau of the United States Department of the Treasury, issued a report regarding centralized and decentralized “virtual currencies” and their legal status within “money services business” (MSB) and Bank Secrecy Act regulations.[48][53] It classified digital currencies and other digital payment systems such as bitcoin as “virtual currencies” because they are not legal tender under any sovereign jurisdiction. FinCEN cleared American users of bitcoin of legal obligations[53] by saying, “A user of virtual currency is not an MSB under FinCEN’s regulations and therefore is not subject to MSB registration, reporting, and recordkeeping regulations.” However, it held that American entities who generate “virtual currency” such as bitcoins are money transmitters or MSBs if they sell their generated currency for national currency: “…a person that creates units of convertible virtual currency and sells those units to another person for real currency or its equivalent is engaged in transmission to another location and is a money transmitter.” This specifically extends to “miners” of the bitcoin currency who may have to register as MSBs and abide by the legal requirements of being a money transmitter if they sell their generated bitcoins for national currency and are within the United States.[46] Since FinCEN issued this guidance, dozens of virtual currency exchangers and administrators have registered with FinCEN, and FinCEN is receiving an increasing number of suspicious activity reports (SARs) from these entities.[175]
The bigger block group called their currency Bitcoin Cash and effectively doubled the holdings of anyone who owned Bitcoin before August 1st. For example, if you have 10 Bitcoins before August 1st, you would now have 10 Bitcoins and 10 Bitcoin Cash.

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