“bitcoin lightning network +bitcoin value”

A bitcoin is worth what the market says it is worth. This is to say that prices vary as a result of supply and demand. As demand for bitcoins rise, the price may rise as well. As demand declines, prices may also decline.
Jed McCaleb, a programmer best known for creating the successful eDonkey peer-to-peer network in 2000, announces the launch of Mt. Gox, a new full-time bitcoin exchange. Based on a prior, abandoned project of McCaleb’s to create an online exchange for Magic: The Gathering cards, he soon struggles to keep up with the demands of the business and sells mtgox.com to Mark Karpelès on March 6, 2011. Mt. Gox would slowly grow to dominate the world of bitcoin trading over the next three years.
The IRS policy document declares Bitcoin to be property, not currency, subject to capital gains tax – with that tax calculated against every change in buying power for a given amount of bitcoin, from the time it’s acquired to the time it’s spent. The decision is widely derided as unwieldy and overly complex, requiring users of the currency to record Bitcoin’s market price with every transaction, subject to an array of largely unfamiliar calculations. Others, however, remark that the net tax paid may often be less than if Bitcoin were treated as currency proper – but to a market that emerged in tax-free innocence, it is a difficult blow to soften.
^ Stewart, David D.; Soong Johnston, Stephanie D. (29 October 2012). “2012 TNT 209-4 NEWS ANALYSIS: VIRTUAL CURRENCY: A NEW WORRY FOR TAX ADMINISTRATORS?. (Release Date: OCTOBER 17, 2012) (Doc 2012-21516)”. Tax Notes Today. 2012 TNT 209-4 (2012 TNT 209–4).
Investors from all walks of life have caught the bug. The Winklevoss twins Tyler and Cameron, made famous after successfully suing Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, are thought to be the first Bitcoin billionaires after buying $11m worth in 2013 – now worth more than $1.6bn.
17-20 November 2017 $7,600-8,100 Briefly topped at USD at 01:14:11 UTC before retreating from highs. At 05:35 UTC on 20 November 2017 it stood at USD$7,988.23/BTC according to CoinDesk.[155] This surge in bitcoin may be related to developments in the 2017 Zimbabwean coup d’état. The market reaction in one bitcoin exchange is alarming as 1 BTC topped nearly US$13,500, just shy of 2 times the value of the International market.[156][157]
Prior to the release of bitcoin there were a number of digital cash technologies starting with the issuer based ecash protocols of David Chaum[3] and Stefan Brands. Adam Back developed hashcash, a proof-of-work scheme for spam control. The first proposals for distributed digital scarcity based cryptocurrencies were Wei Dai’s b-money[4] and Nick Szabo’s bit gold.[5][6] Hal Finney developed reusable proof of work (RPOW) using hashcash as its proof of work algorithm.[7]
Titled “The Underground Website Where You Can Buy Any Drug Imaginable,” Adrian Chen’s piece on Gawker is as provocative as it is popular. To many people reading it, the sudden realization that Bitcoin has a useful value – one that’s entirely unique – hits home. With a link to Mt. Gox in the text, the article starts an enormous upswing in price that beats all previous records, reaching over $31 per bitcoin just one week after publication.
On one side are the so-called core developers. They are in favor of smaller bitcoin blocks, which they say are less vulnerable to hacking. On the other side are the miners, who want to increase the size of blocks to make the network faster and more scalable.
Bitcoin is divorced from governments and central banks. It’s organized through a network known as a blockchain, which is basically an online ledger that keeps a secure record of each transaction and bitcoin price all in one place. Every time anyone buys or sells bitcoin, the swap gets logged. Several hundred of these back-and-forths make up a block.
In early August 2012, a lawsuit was filed in San Francisco court against Bitcoinica — a bitcoin trading venue — claiming about US$460,000 from the company. Bitcoinica was hacked twice in 2012, which led to allegations that the venue neglected the safety of customers’ money and cheated them out of withdrawal requests.[195][196]
Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency, a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to control its creation and management, rather than relying on central authorities.[1] The presumed pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto integrated many existing ideas from the cypherpunk community when creating bitcoin. Over the course of bitcoin’s history, it has undergone rapid growth to become a significant currency both on and offline – from the mid 2010s onward, some businesses on a global scale began accepting bitcoins in addition to fiat currencies.[2]
Originally thought to be a Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attack on the largest bitcoin exchange, the great influx of traders on the heels of Cyprus’s bailout announcement overwhelms Mt. Gox’s servers, causing trades to stutter and fail. Speculative concerns about the exchange’s hiccups feed a powerful panic-sell that saturates the market and drives prices down to pre-rally levels, before rising again a few days later.
The general answer to “why this price?” is “supply and demand.” Price discovery occurs at the meeting point between demand from buyers and supply of sellers. Adapting this model to Bitcoin, it’s clear that the majority of supply is controlled by early adopters and miners.
The entire Bitcoin network uses a block chain. This block chain is basically a shared public ledger that allows for bitcoin wallets to calculate their spendable balances and to verify any new transactions. The block chain uses cryptography to ensure the integrity and chronological order of transactions.
The theft represented “a small fraction of Bitstamp’s total bitcoin reserves” as the majority of the company’s Bitcoin funds remained untouched in offline “cold” storage. No customer account balances were affected. However, according to a leaked internal Bitstamp report on the incident, the damage to the company’s reputation and customer confidence far exceeded its monetary Bitcoin loss.
Beyond the specialists initially drawn to Bitcoin as a solution to technical, economic and political problems, interest among the general public has historically been stimulated by banking blockades and fiat currency crises.
No discussion of Bitcoin’s price would be complete without a mention of the role market manipulation plays in adding to price volatility. At that time, Bitcoin’s all-time high above $1000 was partly driven by an automated trading algorithms, or “bots,” running on the Mt. Gox exchange. All evidence suggests that these bots were operating fraudulently under the direction of exchange operator, Mark Karpeles, bidding up the price with phantom funds.