In 2016 William Mougayar wrote a brilliant piece explaining blockchain technology by leveraging something we all know about: word processing programs. He reminds us that when Microsoft Word was the only game in town, one person had to create a file, open it, then send it to another person to have it edited or updated. The similarity to banks is striking, and makes it clear why blockchain technology was created in the first place:


In 1998, Wei Dai published a description of "b-money", characterized as an anonymous, distributed electronic cash system.[12] Shortly thereafter, Nick Szabo described bit gold.[13] Like bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that would follow it, bit gold (not to be confused with the later gold-based exchange, BitGold) was described as an electronic currency system which required users to complete a proof of work function with solutions being cryptographically put together and published. A currency system based on a reusable proof of work was later created by Hal Finney who followed the work of Dai and Szabo.
The good news: No advanced math or computation is involved. You may have heard that miners are solving difficult mathematical problems--that's not true at all. What they're actually doing is trying to be the first miner to come up with a 64-digit hexadecimal number (a "hash")  that is less than or equal to the target hash. It's basically guess work.
Ether is a necessary element — a fuel — for operating the distributed application platform Ethereum. It is a form of payment made by the clients of the platform to the machines executing the requested operations. To put it another way, ether is the incentive ensuring that developers write quality applications (wasteful code costs more), and that the network remains healthy (people are compensated for their contributed resources).

I understand that this is simplifying things to the extreme, but that's why an entire series of guides is needed! It's a complex landscape to understand, but the core is simple: miners are people independently verifying transactions on the coin's network, and when that happens more coins are created. Miners effectively keep the network running and increase the coin's global supply.


Support levels, in a sense, are the mirror image of resistance levels. They look like a “floor” Bitcoin’s price doesn’t seem to go below when the price drops . A support level will be accompanied by a lot of buy orders set at the level’s price. The high demand of a buyer at the support level cushions the downtrend. Historically, the more frequently the price has been unable to move beyond the support or resistance levels, the stronger these levels are considered.
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